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  #121 (permalink)  
Old 10-28-2013, 06:21 AM
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During the time I was just practicing laying beads down I was using a cheap helmet the school offered (same one I used when I tried stick welding a few years back). Before too long a lot of the guys on TIG were telling me my helmet was too dark and to get an auto darkening helmet. After doing a lot of research I bought a Miller Digital Elite and haven't looked back since. Makes all the difference in the world if you can actually see what you're doing. Good luck with the MIG.
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  #122 (permalink)  
Old 10-29-2013, 11:06 AM
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Tig welding looks good. Digging this build so far.
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  #123 (permalink)  
Old 11-01-2013, 09:31 PM
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Still waiting on parts to come in. Think two of my parts are on backorder, what the hell...

Started with stainless a ways back. Uses the same tungsten I've been using for mild steel (thoriated), and also welds DCEN (DC electrode negative). Bought a new stainless wire brush so I don't contaminate the metal with mild steel particles from my previous test plates.

Ran some beads...



Puddle behaves weird. Hard to describe, it doesn't "flow'' quite the same as on mild steel. It kinda just wanders all over the place, harder to control direction without a weld joint to guide it.

Started with lap joints...



With stainless you can't heat it up too much or you'll burn out the chromium in it, resulting in a dark gray weld that is inferior. If you get a nice rainbow color you're in the right heat range. Found pretty quickly I had to lower my amperage and increase my travel speed a bit to get this color.

Single pass lap joint...



Ran a bunch more...in the pic immediately below, my first lap weld is closest to the camera, with subsequent welds moving upward.



Welded the backside of the same plate...



Really happy with my lap joints. On mild steel I was constantly burning away the top plate. But with the slightly thicker stainless, I start my puddle on the bottom plate, move it up just enough to wash up onto the top plate, and run my bead across. I'm also liking the fact that I don't have to worry about removing mill scale with the stainless.
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  #124 (permalink)  
Old 11-02-2013, 06:44 AM
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How are you pointing your tungsten? Should be vertically to the grinding wheel not horizontally, also a wheel specifically for sharpening is ideal although not always practical. We have an older syncrowave at work and that arc wanders like a sob at low amps. My 250 walks all over it. Keeping the tungsten sharp helps.
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  #125 (permalink)  
Old 11-02-2013, 09:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northside W&M View Post
How are you pointing your tungsten? Should be vertically to the grinding wheel not horizontally, also a wheel specifically for sharpening is ideal although not always practical. We have an older syncrowave at work and that arc wanders like a sob at low amps. My 250 walks all over it. Keeping the tungsten sharp helps.
The stability of the arc is not so much the issue I think. I keep the tungsten nice and sharp, grind it as you described on a dedicated grinder. So contamination is not an issue and the arc doesn't wander. It's more like the puddle itself wants to do its own ders a bit compared to mild steel. On mild steel it just goes where I want it to go. On stainless I have to coax it a bit more. Hard to describe really.

Since I'm only in welding for this one semester I'm just looking to get a taste for welding on the different materials. Not looking to master any one in particular so it's not a huge deal. Thanks for the feedback.
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  #126 (permalink)  
Old 11-03-2013, 11:14 AM
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Right on, keep up the good work
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  #127 (permalink)  
Old 11-05-2013, 11:59 AM
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Found out that a Brembo rotor I had been waiting on since October 17 had apparently been delivered two weeks ago but I never got a package! UPS says it was left at my front door but I was home that day and didn't receive anything. I've seen UPS trucks drive through the neighborhood and even make a delivery next door at one point, but of course the neighbors claim they didn't get anything addressed to me. Talking with the seller now to figure out what my options are. Fucking UPS!

Last edited by DIABOLUS; 11-05-2013 at 12:19 PM..
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  #128 (permalink)  
Old 11-05-2013, 12:46 PM
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Your TIG beads look progressively better and better, nice work. Since there isn't anything in the pics to help determine scale I am thinking those beads look very big so I am wondering what size tungsten and filler rod you are using? For most of the major welds on my bikes I was using 3/32 tungsten and filler rod, seems to be the nicest combination of penetration for that tube wall thickness while keeping the bead very tight in appearance.
I see you got your own personal Miller hood, good choice, I have the same model. Not sure if you have your own welder, but I would tell you to get your own as soon as possible.... This probably won't be the last bike you do and you may end up wanting to do a car or help out friends with their projects, plus tons of non-motor type metal projects that are handy around the house. Trust me, its so worth it to have your own machine. I got mine off CL for $1200, it was a $3300 machine. For Christmas I'm hoping Santa brings me a Miller 211 MIG, I have a ton of project ideas that are not TIG applications, plus it will be much better for tack weld when I start on my car (that I have yet to purchase).
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  #129 (permalink)  
Old 11-05-2013, 09:09 PM
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What TIG welder do you have, Cloud? I'm looking at the Miller Dynasty series. Debating between the 200 and the 280, but leaning more toward the 280. Should be more welder than I will ever probably need.

Good eye on the welds, I am using 3/32 tungsten and filler. Some of my really early stuff on mild steel was on 1/16" stock and I was using the same 3/32 tungsten but 1/16 filler rod. Everything after that (stainless included) is 1/8" stock with 3/32 tungsten and filler.
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  #130 (permalink)  
Old 11-06-2013, 05:34 AM
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I have a scyncrowave 200 never did understand the difference.
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  #131 (permalink)  
Old 11-06-2013, 12:26 PM
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I have the Econo-TIG, which is the same as the Diversion 165, just the older model name of the same welder. Pretty simple, all analog controls with not automatic pre-sets and 220V only power. The Dynasty 280 is probably way more welder than you would ever need, but it has some cool features. If you learn how to use them and use the often enough they are worth having, but that unit is expensive… well, pretty much all Miller welders are, but they are quality and repairable at any weld shop.
My recommendation for anyone doing mostly steel on bikes and even cars is the Diversion 180, step up from the 165 so you get plug adapter to use 110 0r 220 power, that way you use it anywhere; like at your buddy's house who pays you in beer and barter because he can paint or rebuild motors or whatever…. If you have the coin, AND you think you will have the need and the means to use the extra features then go for the Dynasty 280, again the Dynasty 280 has the multi-voltage plug adapter, it can even run 3 phase power.
To address JSP's comment above as well… he has a Syncrowave and I'm jealous. I'm not electrical engineer, but let me try my best to break this down; The Syncrowave has Squarewave AC: When you run high voltage power its almost just like sound waves, they have frequencies. Low frequencies are bass, high freqs are treble, the way you combine and mix the sounds makes a pattern, and what pattern you put out your sound as can make welds better, more smooth, and consistent. Well, I went into all that explanation but the thing is we are mostly doing steel on our bike builds, which is DC negative on the TIG. The Squarewave AC, pulse TIG features, digital auto pre-sets, and all the other bells and whistles on the Syncrowave are mostly for Aluminum and other sensitive metals… By the way, if you are a smooth operator you can pulse TIG on the foot pedal, that's the old school boys do it.
If I wanted to upgrade from my Econo-TIG and I got the Diversion 180, that is really only just paying a lot of money to get the multi-voltage plug and a few other small features, MSRP is just under $2K.
I'll stick with my Econo-TIG for awhile, if i do want a real upgrade I'd go for the Dynasty 280… It has some cool features I'd want but many I may never use, and the sticker shock is $5K. I would probably never buy a Syncrowave, I don't ever see myself doing the type of work that would justify buying that machine; the 250 DX… the 210 is more reasonable on price.

Well, my best advice is to always check CL and other classifieds, never pay full price and find something in fairly good shape. It will be quite some time before I upgrade my TIG I imagine, first I want the Millermatic 211 MIG to do the spot welds on my hot-rod and other home improvement stuff, and then a plasma cutter because I'll probably have to cut the floor pans out of said hot-rod.

I still have yet to build a good welding table (but I have 2 nice portable ones), and I also need to build a welder/bottle cart for the TIG and possibly some wall racks for tubing and sheet metal.
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  #132 (permalink)  
Old 11-07-2013, 06:47 AM
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Thanks for the info cloudDiver! i also want a millermatic 211 sometime in the future. That would be a great welder to have.
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  #133 (permalink)  
Old 11-07-2013, 12:09 PM
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Thanks for the detailed info Cloud. At the absolute minimum I want whatever welder I buy to be capable welding up a frame if I need to. Looking at my CFL frame for example, I think the thickest joint on the entire frame would be where the front engine mount joins the two forward control mounting plates. The crossmember is 1"x1" square stock and the smaller plates are 3/8" thick. Everything else is welded to round tubing in one form or another so I'm looking at .120 wall if memory serves.

So am I right in assuming I need a welder that can weld a maximum thickness of 3/8" in steel? Or do I need something rated slightly higher than that? When they say max thickness, or we talking full penetration square groove butt joints? What about fillet welds of thicker material, say, a tee joint made from 1/2" steel plates for a frame jig? I wouldn't need full penetration on a joint like that.

Here's the breakdown off of Miller's website with MSRP and max thicknesses for steel. As far as aluminum, my needs will likely be limited to gas tanks and oil tanks so max thickness is not a huge concern.

Syncrowave 210 (1/4" max) - $3197
Syncrowave 250DX (1/2" max) - $3908
Syncrowave 350LX (5/8" max) - $6096

Dynasty 200 (1/4" max) - $3856
Dynasty 280 (3/8" max) - $4967
Dynasty 350 (5/8" max) - $7837

Obviously I would try to source one of these welders in used condition for less than MSRP, but for taking into account my future needs, which one would work best for me? Thanks again.

Last edited by DIABOLUS; 11-07-2013 at 12:13 PM..
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  #134 (permalink)  
Old 11-07-2013, 08:13 PM
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I just got a 211 a couple weeks ago. The place I'm renting has 110 and I'm buying a place and will be wiring it with 60 amp 220. I've been practicing and its user friendly with the auto set feature. But it's a mig welder so not exactly laying dimes. I'm finishing fabrication on my 140 tack welding it with the mig and will have chassis design do all the finish welding. Eventually I will want to get a good Tig welder leaning towards a miller synchro wave 200. Keep up the good work your welds look nice and are inspiring me.
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  #135 (permalink)  
Old 11-08-2013, 05:57 PM
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Thanks for the compliments Fly. I thought I was making good progress on the stainless lap joints and moved on to butt joints. Was having serious problems with fit-up. The hydraulic shear we have in the shop warps the pieces as it cuts them. I didn't have the foresight the number the individual pieces as they were cut, so the different pieces were joined up in a random manner. Some joints had a nice parallel gap between them, but on the backside there might be no gap. So the butt joint on one side might look good, but on the backside with no gap the puddle wouldn't flow right and the weld would look crappy. Did two pieces like this.

Front sides:



You can see a nice ripple pattern on most joints, but they still look pretty crappy. The fit-up is really killing me.

The backside:



You can see how much more the puddle wanders when it doesn't have a good gap to flow into. Not happy with the results but if I had better equipment to cut shit straight it might have turned out better.

Outside corner joints:





These ere even worse than butt joints. Because of the warping of the pieces, the valley between the two pieces would be uneven; really tight in some parts, wide in others. The damn puddle just wouldn't track straight. I don't remember outside corner joints being this hard on mild steel.
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