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Looking for advice from the Old Pros...
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10 My First Build... an 06 CFL 2Up 2Out
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  #76 (permalink)  
Old 10-11-2013, 01:08 PM
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No sticker here, it's the real deal.

Cloud part of me thinks that if I went the padded seat route the ride with forward controls might not be too bad. But I've never ridden a rigid before so I know fuck all. Maybe if I switched to mids a rigid-mounted chip seat wouldn't be too bad? Any bad bumps on the road and I could just rise up off the seat slightly.

I haven't seen a suspended seat setup on a CFL that appealed to me...I'm too much of a sucker for clean lines. There was one shop CFL that had a Rigidaire setup on it and looked clean enough, but I've got enough fabrication to worry about without cramming a compressor and airbag on my frame. But who knows...I'll be riding my frame unpainted for a while so if I need to add some brackets and change the seat setup later it won't be an issue.

Can't wait to see that other CFL of yours...let's get some more build threads going again!
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  #77 (permalink)  
Old 10-11-2013, 04:34 PM
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I think Scooters sells a similiar motor mount to the wcc one.
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  #78 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2013, 07:51 AM
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the only regret I had with my CFL was not doing a rigid set up on the seat. I did a single coil over (which look shitty) and put the seat super low. still took away from the looks. I have since ridden vintage harleys with king/queens and some with 1.5" springs and I have to say the best I ever rode was the fixed seat on the rigid. the frames flex enough to ease the shock and if you find it unbearable you can always add a drilled through spring pearch.

looking good man!
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  #79 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2013, 11:22 AM
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I've ridden nothing but rigids my whole life and they're not as bad as ppl say. a trick is to run low air pressure in the rear. i use to run 18 pounds on the old 5:00 tires and now with a 250 i run around 22 pounds. the only thing that will rattle your brain are multiple bumps (2 or 3 in a row) NOW THOSE SUCK. The good part is you become part of the bike, any little body flinch and the bike reacts to it.
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  #80 (permalink)  
Old 10-13-2013, 06:45 AM
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Knocked off the bent lobe on my CFL axle and machined a new one for welding. Lent it to a buddy of mine who was next door at the welding shop. Said he could have it done in a day or two.

With the brake caliper bracket tackled I decided that there was just one more CNC challenge for me before classes ended: 3-D machining. With regular machining, the cutter moves up/down (Z-axis) to a certain position, then along a certain direction (X/Y axes). Not X/Y/Z at the same time.

With 3-D machining, the cutter is moving along the XY plane while simultaneously making adjustments in the Z-axis. The end result (especially if paired with a ball end mill) is curved shapes not possible with conventional cutting techniques. The downside is that the program becomes ridiculously long.

Below is (obviously) a WCC-style Doom wheel. Wheel was cut at half-scale out of plastic, then out of 3/8" aluminum (which would correspond to half of a 3/4" wheel web thickness). At 50% scale, the program was 65,000 lines long, front and back. Scaled up to 100%, this would equate to roughly 250,000 lines of code. And this is with a gap of .050 between toolpaths. If I reduced that width to make the curves smoother I would easily be looking at over 1 million lines of code. There's a good reason WCC took like 5 days to machine their front wheels and 8 days to cut the rears.

Prototype was cut out of inch-thick plastic and everything looked good.



Aluminum part, however had some gouging due to a warped aluminum plate. I didn't have 3/8" thick stock so I machined a 1/2" plate down to 3/8". Piece was apparently bowed enough that the cutter was gounging at certain points. If the piece were perfectly flat it would have come out perfectly.





I forgot to mention that the POS VMC600 I was using had a problem with its internal memory and could only hold programs that were 10,000 lines long. So I had to bust up the program into seven smaller programs. Load the first program, cut the first program, delete the first program. Load the second program, so on and so forth.

Last edited by DIABOLUS; 10-13-2013 at 06:50 AM..
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  #81 (permalink)  
Old 10-13-2013, 06:56 AM
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Are you writing your own G-code? I've watched guys do it, and just cant bring myself too, but it seems the best guys I know see everything like its a screen on the matrix. Looks like you're off to a good start though.
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  #82 (permalink)  
Old 10-13-2013, 07:17 AM
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Simpler parts it's possible to write your own G-code. Something like this though is impossible. We have a program called Camworks in class that lets you model a 3-D part and extrapolates information about the parts shape to generate toolpaths. In all honesty it's a crappy program. The industry standard seems to be Mastercam. Hope to learn that one at some point. Mastercam paired with Haas is where it's at.
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  #83 (permalink)  
Old 10-13-2013, 09:32 PM
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04.14.13 - Ordered some sealed bearings to take to the stealership but they were Chinese junk quality. Returned them immediately. Had mad resistance to them and didn't roll smoothly at all. I'll just have Harley install a set of their OEM bearings when it comes time to do my bearings.

04.18.13 - Found a new vendor that claimed to have my desired model of Ultima starter in stock and placed an order with them. And wouldn't you know it? Turns out they didn't have it after all. Cancelled the order and started looking at Spyke starters but haven't settled on which one I want.

04.23.13 - WCC wire loom. Been wanting one of these for a good two years. Practically stole it for what I paid.



04.26.13 - 44 mag oil cap. Wasn't planning on buying this, but it popped up and was mad cheap. So what the hell...



05.04.13 - For the longest time I was planning on running my OG Warbird taillight on my CFL build. But a small part of me was paranoid about trashing a light I paid ridiculous money for. This was very early on in my build before I knew what I know now, and before the smaller repops became available. I broke down and sold my big taillight and bought a cheapo Warbird Jr. I think the LED lighting will work better and if it breaks who gives a damn.

More importantly, I'm planning on running a vertical tag and the OG Warbird is too massive. Sold it without a hitch, but lost a lot of money on it. So it goes...



05.12.13 - My list of parts to buy has been getting shorter, and I'd put this one off long enough. ART style clutch cover from Speed Dealer.



05.22.13 - Found a Spyke starter for my build that was well reviewed.

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  #84 (permalink)  
Old 10-14-2013, 12:05 PM
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I've run Spyke Starters on everything, both CFL's (of course only 1 is finished) and also put Spyke's on friend's HD's that needed a replacement starter. They have always worked as advertised and I haven't seen a failure yet. As a testament to that, the battery that starts my CFL is much smaller than what is "recommended" in terms of HD Softail OEM standard, but the planetary gear in the Spyke starter adds the extra cranking power with gear reduction so it doesn't strain the battery. Along with that a CFL does not have a crap load of other electrical accessories that strain the amp draw during starting load.
I was using a Shorai Lithium battery at first, it fit the Chassis Design Co. battery box perfectly. The only reason that battery failed was my own fault. There wasn't enough insulation around the crimped lug on the starter hot, and the way it was positioned on the lug it was making contact with the solenoid casing. One day during cold starting the insulation gave it up and burned through causing a short (and a bunch of smoke). I thought I ruined the started or at least the contacts in the solenoid. turns out the battery was lunched (won't charge above 9.6V), but the starter was not harmed. I re-crimped the lug and but better silicone insulation (self vulcanizing F4 tape), and bolted it back on with better clearance so it did not touch. I got a new lead acid battery that fit the Chassis Design battery box, but the size is typically for Sportsters. Still starts the bike fine every time. That's just my .02 on Spyke starters.
P.S. I got my chrome Spyke starter off ebay for .99 cents because the guy didn't pt a reserve on his auction! shipping was $25, lol!
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  #85 (permalink)  
Old 10-14-2013, 12:13 PM
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The other thing Dude, I think you should capitalize on your CNC skills. If you have the space and a spare 220V circuit in your home garage, I would lease a newer machine that can handle all the stuff your school machine is having issues with. During your lease crank out all the parts you need for your bike, and then make some money doing jobs for other people. I wish I had your skills... Now you have me looking for classes to take!

p.s. I'm not saying make WCC parts for other people... I think its ok to do it for yourself since those parts are not available anymore, just don't try to sell any to anyone. Use your CNC skills to make anything else for other paying customers.... Hot rod parts, hard to find brackets, non-copyright generic bike and car parts, anything.... Don't get yourself in trouble!
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  #86 (permalink)  
Old 10-14-2013, 09:16 PM
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Yeah having my own CNC machine would be a dream...the overhead on CNC is so expensive though. Besides the machine cost, there's all the cutters, toolholders, measuring instruments, etc. Mastercam alone is in the tens of thousands of dollars. It's ridiculous. Owning my own two or three-person shop is the long term plan, how I get there remains to be seen. And I'm greedy and untrusting enough to where having a financially-invested partner is less than appealing. Maybe if I met the right person.
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  #87 (permalink)  
Old 10-14-2013, 09:30 PM
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I have a buddy up here that was working as an operator, and met an old machinist that had been squirreling away cash for years. Backed his first couple of used machines. When the old guy that ran the shop he had worked at before passed away, he got first crack at all their equipment and took everything with a little help from the bank. He built a good rep for himself and his shop has nearly doubled in size every year for the 4 or 5 he's been in business, and he usually buys a new machine at least every 6 months, wether its a WW2 lathe, or a live tool multi axis CNC lathe. He is honestly one of the best operators I've met though, and has one of those eccentric brains.
Worry about the basics first. If the rest is gonna happen., it willl fall into place on its own.
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Old 10-15-2013, 09:11 PM
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Thanks for the input guys. It's all one big learning process for me. Started with machining. Want to tackle TIG welding. Then learn pipe bending and eventually sheet metal forming. Things will really get interesting then.

06.07.13 - Scooter's wiring harness. Not looking forward to the wiring stage. Never been much of an electrical guy. Fortunately my dad loves that stuff so he'll be giving me a hand.



06.26.13 - WCC Maltese Cross cleaner finally showed up for a reasonable price. Haven't decided if I'm running my Coffin or the Maltese Cross but now I have options.



07.12.13 - Bought some pipe pliers for when it comes time to weld bungs onto my frame.

07.19.13 - Took my wheels and all my bearing components to the stealership. Didn't want to deal with the endplay business so I figured I'd just let them handle it until it came time to cut some billet wheels. They installed new sealed bearings in the front wheels, but could not set up my rear wheel.

Apparently the crush tube that came with my Ultima wheel was too short. They could not say by how much. I had brought them all the parts that came with the wheel originally. No shims of any kind had come with it. They didn't have shims or even the means of cutting a new crush tube. The tech guy recommended I run sealed bearings instead. I explained to him how sealed bearings have a larger OD than Timken bearings, and his response was basically, "No man, they totally make them in the same OD." Which is a load of shit because I'd already done the research. I know that at one point there was a sealed bearing conversion kit available for purchase but no longer. Now I have a couple options:

Option 1: Find another shop to cut a new crush tube and set up my wheel with proper endplay.

Option 2: Buy a new rear wheel with sealed bearings. But then I have to figure out how to re-mount my tire onto the new wheel. And I have no guarantee the sprocket spacer I made will even offset the sprocket to the identical distance I had so carefully measured. Furthermore, the dimensions on the sprocket spacer are set up for Timken style wheels. I'd have to do more machining work to adapt them to the newer style wheels. And open up my rotor and sprocket while I'm at it. Fuck my life.

Option 3: Find this "magical" sealed bearing that will fit into Timken-style wheel hubs.


So all in all, paid $180 to get my front bearings installed. Fuck the stealership. Got home in a rotten mood at the huge step backwards I felt I took.

07.19.13 - Oury rubber grips. Decided I'm not running my billet knurled grips. Going for something a little more old-school. Also bought a cheap plastic throttle sleeve. Cut the rubber grips down to make them narrower.



07.19.13 - Brembo 4-pad calipers.



I've been agonizing over my choice in brakes the entire course of the build. I want the best brakes, and don't want to go cheap on them. But at the same time I don't want to pay out the ass for them. I thought I would be happy with 2-piston Brembos, but the caliper is too wide for the front. And the mounting holes are not threaded, which makes the caliper and hardware setup a bit messier.

Bought a set of used Ducati calipers for just over half of what I would have spent on a single chrome 4-pad for the front. Only challenge I see is I have a left-side caliper and a right-side caliper. WCC bikes use two left-side calipers, which means my rear caliper bracket will have to be unique. I could always buy another left-side caliper but I don't feel like spending more money and most used calipers are sold in pairs.

Last edited by DIABOLUS; 10-15-2013 at 09:14 PM..
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  #89 (permalink)  
Old 10-16-2013, 11:47 AM
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+1 on what Spider said... There is a bunch of research and grunt work you have to do, but it will be worth it. I know what you mean by not wanting to have a partner, find a way to get all your own financing. Work with your local SBA. Research state and fed gov programs to get grants or low interest business loans. I'm a Vet and I know there are a ton of resources out there you just have to be willing to put your nose to the grindstone and do the leg work.
I'd stay out of machine work focused on vehicles/motorcycles... Do that shit on the side for fun, make your own parts and stuff for friends. For business, there is a retarded amount of work out there if you do your homework, make the right connections, and lock down contracts. At the end of the day you should never have to touch a machine yourself anymore... Your staff of operators will be running equipment on 3 shifts 24/7 while you are in the office locking down big money deals. If you prefer the machine work over the management side, hire somebody to do that side of the house so you can handle operations on the floor.
The first few years could suck... Paying back the start up loans, equipment costs, getting no sleep while you are pushing out work and trying to lock down new jobs or contracts 24/7... give up going to the movies, drinking beer, or anything fun or frivolous spending because every cent counts. But after those first few years are over and the loans are paid back, you have constant work flow, good employees, and have built a solid reputation... then it will be worth it while you pull down a 6 figure profit, your retirement plan is rock solid, and you have your own corner of the machine shop and the time to work your personal projects.

Fuck me... I should take my own advice!


Quote:
Originally Posted by DIABOLUS View Post
Yeah having my own CNC machine would be a dream...the overhead on CNC is so expensive though. Besides the machine cost, there's all the cutters, toolholders, measuring instruments, etc. Mastercam alone is in the tens of thousands of dollars. It's ridiculous. Owning my own two or three-person shop is the long term plan, how I get there remains to be seen. And I'm greedy and untrusting enough to where having a financially-invested partner is less than appealing. Maybe if I met the right person.
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  #90 (permalink)  
Old 10-16-2013, 11:51 AM
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All of that ^^^

The problem becomes when you lose the "fun" that got you doing it for a living. I always tell people that if you love doing it as a hobby, dont become self employed doing it. With a few exceptions what ends up happening is you push the business in the direction that you have fun, build a clientele doing that, and your fun time becomes work time. Thats what happened to me, and its the reason I've stepped back and found new ways to have fun, that I try not to involve my shop in.
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