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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 03-12-2009, 05:31 AM
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03 Texas chopper..how much fork oil?

Hello,
I have an 03 AIH texas chopper and I want to change my fork oil. Does anyone know how much these forks call for?

thanks for any help, Dan
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Old 03-12-2009, 07:55 AM
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Ive you havent drained the oil aready. Drain in and measure how much comes out and put that amout back in. There is a wet and dry measurement. Also its debateable how much oil with extended forks. So just put back in what you had if it rode fine.
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Old 03-12-2009, 01:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thompsongunner View Post
Hello,
I have an 03 AIH texas chopper and I want to change my fork oil. Does anyone know how much these forks call for?

thanks for any help, Dan
12 oz. wet

14 oz dry



.
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  #4 (permalink)  
Old 03-12-2009, 01:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Merlin Hawaii View Post
12 oz. wet

14 oz dry



.
I thought I saw a debate on here about the amount of oil in forks, may depend on how many inches over stock the front end is.
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Old 03-12-2009, 01:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bodangles View Post
I thought I saw a debate on here about the amount of oil in forks, may depend on how many inches over stock the front end is.
Sure does. The space in there above the oil acts as an air spring. Forks bottom out because of 2 things: too soft a spring or too low an oil level or both!

If you don't have enough oil in the forks they will bottom easier. The open space above the spring/oil acts as an air spring. As the fork near full travel, the oil pushes against the air in the forks and the forks get firmer. The higher the oil level, the sooner this happens. the lower the oil the later.

To really be accurate, oil level should be measured as just that, oil level. Typically you take the springs out, collapse the forks and measure from the top of the tube down to the oil. That is the proper way to do it. Just dumping in a certain amount you could be way off.

The amount of oil can differ in the end because different people prefer different things in their forks. Someone who weighs 230lbs would take less oil (a little maybe) than someone who weighs 140lbs.

Does this really matter with chops? probably not because most of them run old style damping rod forks which really aren't that great to begin with.

I'll stop rambling now but hope this helps a little

Last edited by bigtwin100; 03-12-2009 at 01:49 PM..
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Old 03-12-2009, 01:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Merlin Hawaii View Post
12 oz. wet

14 oz dry

.
Those are AIH specs

I didn't just make 'em up



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Last edited by Merlin Hawaii; 03-12-2009 at 02:00 PM..
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Old 03-12-2009, 01:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bodangles View Post
I thought I saw a debate on here about the amount of oil in forks, may depend on how many inches over stock the front end is.
Also, say if you knew what your oil level was on a stock set of forks, it would not matter how much over your front end was, you would just set them to the same oil level
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Old 03-13-2009, 08:46 AM
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Malarky! Tube length has no bearing on oil amount. It's the sliders and the mechanics inside the sliders that determines how much oil you need.

That air pressure idea is not reasonable. If it were, how is compensation made for altitude. Don't say the shocks are vented, then there is no pressure.

Pay attention to Merlin - he's got it right.

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Old 03-13-2009, 08:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricky-D View Post
Malarky! Tube length has no bearing on oil amount. It's the sliders and the mechanics inside the sliders that determines how much oil you need.

That air pressure idea is not reasonable. If it were, how is compensation made for altitude. Don't say the shocks are vented, then there is no pressure.

Pay attention to Merlin - he's got it right.

***
You are dead wrong. Call or email any suspension tuner and ask them. There is air inside the fork that cannot be removed. It is refered to as an air spring for the lack of a better term and it is real. It's a fact of life. in fact the pressure goes up as the temp goes up and altitude that you cannot control. If you look at motocross forks, there are bleed screws on top to control just that, air pressure build up. On damping rod forks you set the oil level up to get a happy medium. Cartridge forks you can fine tune them a little better. What I said is true. I advise you learn WTF you're talking about before you come on here and make false statements. How much experience do you have dissassembling damper rod and cartride forks and fine tuning oil level and compression/rebound and preload settings to get a bike to handle good on the race track? I'm guessing 0 from your ignorant statement

If you go over on your fork tubes you need to up the oil level to get the same bottoming resistance. I have MANY years of setting up forks for the race track and this is common knowledge. How you can call it BS? Like I said, does it matter on Chops? probably not because they don't handle all that great anyway.

Contact Traxxion Dynamics or Racetech and they can explain it slowly to you so
you get it.

I have no problem debating this with you because what I'm saying is common suspension industry standards. I didn't make this stuff up
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Old 03-13-2009, 12:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricky-D View Post
Malarky! Tube length has no bearing on oil amount. It's the sliders and the mechanics inside the sliders that determines how much oil you need.

That air pressure idea is not reasonable. If it were, how is compensation made for altitude. Don't say the shocks are vented, then there is no pressure.

Pay attention to Merlin - he's got it right.

***
Here ya go. I found this in about 2 seconds. obviously he must be wrong also

http://www.4strokes.com/tech/ktm/forkoil.asp

It's the same info for all forks
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Old 03-14-2009, 02:28 PM
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Quote:
It's the same info for all forks
Mike Rosso is talking exclusively about sealed fork systems.

He also says you can remove the springs from the forks and you wouldn't miss them.

I guess you would do that also. Maybe recommend that too, huh?

What you're doing is taking a very selective piece of literature and applying it to a generic type of fork system that IH has been using.

Damping systems rely on oil exclusively for their action and are not air pressure sensitive. The are not considered shock absorbers but rebound dampeners.

Cartridge system shocks are self contained sealed systems that may have as an adjunct an oil or air dampening system to complement their action. Much like the gas filled shocks you can find on the newer automobiles.

Just because you've been doing something for an extended period of time and relaying the oft use "common knowledge" justifier does not make it true. I guess there are some, that may say what's true in one case is true in all cases, but that would not be me.

I don't think I have anymore to say on this issue.

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Old 03-14-2009, 03:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricky-D View Post
Mike Rosso is talking exclusively about sealed fork systems.

He also says you can remove the springs from the forks and you wouldn't miss them.

I guess you would do that also. Maybe recommend that too, huh?

What you're doing is taking a very selective piece of literature and applying it to a generic type of fork system that IH has been using.

Damping systems rely on oil exclusively for their action and are not air pressure sensitive. The are not considered shock absorbers but rebound dampeners.

Cartridge system shocks are self contained sealed systems that may have as an adjunct an oil or air dampening system to complement their action. Much like the gas filled shocks you can find on the newer automobiles.

Just because you've been doing something for an extended period of time and relaying the oft use "common knowledge" justifier does not make it true. I guess there are some, that may say what's true in one case is true in all cases, but that would not be me.

I don't think I have anymore to say on this issue.

Are you serious???? First all, he was stating removing the springs as an example. Setting up forks is not rocket science. I have done cartridge and damping rod forks.

you are an ignorant fool. Damping rod forks all all the same. also, they are all sealed systems jack ass. You do not know what you are talking about. Before you debate things make sure you know what the hell you are talking about.

Twist it anyway you like. Damping rod forks have an air chamber that work in parrallel with the springs. They do not rely on only oil exclusively. You are twisting this around to make it sound like you know what you are talking about but you need some education.

Feel free to comment some more but I think it is clear that you should really just be quiet if you don't know

Last edited by bigtwin100; 03-14-2009 at 03:36 PM..
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  #13 (permalink)  
Old 03-14-2009, 03:39 PM
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There aren't many fork designs out there. What he states is true across the board with either cartridge or damping rod forks. Please enlighten us all to a new design that only you know of that have absolutely 0 air inside them and have no effect on compression
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Old 03-14-2009, 06:36 PM
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I unsubscribed to this thread because you can't reason with stupid.

To the original poster, good luck and don't listen to this tool. If you have any doubt seek the advice of a professional. Good luck
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