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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 12-31-2009, 04:49 PM
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chopperwerks. That's a hell of a deal. If I was building something now I'd scoop that up. Great looking too!
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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 01-01-2010, 12:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChopperWerks View Post
First, they have duel bearings on each side which makes them very smooth. The master cylinder is warranted for life. The master cylinder piston is billet not nylon. The arm shafts are all stainless steel. Price to Chopper Club Members that give input : $399.00 plus shipping. PM me for orders and payment.

We used to use Accutronix's top line on some of our bikes. I'm confident you'll like these much better at 1/3 the price. All our products are manufactured here in the U.S.A.
That's a steal for that kind of quality and machining! I will be getting some of these for my build soon.

Do you guys make any of the multi-piece or multi-piece look rims with the 12 pt hardware around the outer edges? I am looking for some of those in a flared 5 spoke design but the prices I've found are ridiculous on those things.
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  #18 (permalink)  
Old 01-01-2010, 07:26 AM
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Force,

We make high quality wheels and can make those, but I try to steer people away from that two piece look simply because you get filiform corrosion around the allen head fasteners as well as the seams.
  #19 (permalink)  
Old 01-16-2010, 06:53 PM
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They appear to be high quality controls. Good work. Bob
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  #20 (permalink)  
Old 01-16-2010, 07:22 PM
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Always cracks me up when people state "it aircraft grade billet", so tell us what that means. As if it means that it won’t snap, Aluminum will snap.....but in these application I would have to imagine having it snap would be better than if they were made of steel. I am in no ways putting down the controls.....just always find it funny that in this industry the "aircraft grade billet" it thrown around like it’s something special. when in fact all it means is that aircraft industry uses aluminum.....um yep, that is correct. Then the word billet.....all that means is it comes from one piece......which is usually how any normal person would machine items of this nature. Anyways, good looking product at a good price!

And for those who are interested:

Aluminum Alloys can be divided into nine groups.


1xxx Unalloyed (pure) >99% Al
2xxx Copper is the principal alloying element, though other elements (Magnesium) may be specified
3xxx Manganese is the principal alloying element
4xxx Silicon is the principal alloying element
5xxx Magnesium is the principal alloying element
6xxx Magnesium and Silicon are principal alloying elements
7xxx Zinc is the principal alloying element, but other elements such as Copper, Magnesium, Chromium, and Zirconium may be specified
8xxx Other elements (including Tin and some Lithium compositions)
9xxx Reserved for future use

1xxx Series. These grades of aluminum are characterized by excellent corrosion resistance, high thermal and electrical conductivities, low mechanical properties, and excellent workability. Moderate increases in strength may be obtained by strain hardening. Iron and silicon are the major impurities.

2xxx Series. These alloys require solution heat treatment to obtain optimum properties; in the solution heat-treated condition, mechanical properties are similar to, and sometimes exceed, those of low-carbon steel. In some instances, precipitation heat treatment (aging) is employed to further increase mechanical properties. This treatment increases yield strength, with attendant loss in elongation; its effect on tensile strength is not as great.
The alloys in the 2xxx series do not have as good corrosion resistance as most other aluminum alloys, and under certain conditions they may be subject to intergranular corrosion. Alloys in the 2xxx series are good for parts requiring good strength at temperatures up to 150 °C (300 °F). Except for alloy 2219, these alloys have limited weldability, but some alloys in this series have superior machinability.

3xxx Series. These alloys generally are non-heat treatable but have about 20% more strength than 1xxx series alloys. Because only a limited percentage of manganese (up to about 1.5%) can be effectively added to aluminum, manganese is used as major element in only a few alloys.

4xxx Series. The major alloying element in 4xxx series alloys is silicon, which can be added in sufficient quantities (up to 12%) to cause substantial lowering of the melting range. For this reason, aluminum-silicon alloys are used in welding wire and as brazing alloys for joining aluminum, where a lower melting range than that of the base metal is required. The alloys containing appreciable amounts of silicon become dark gray to charcoal when anodic oxide finishes are applied and hence are in demand for architectural applications.

5xxx Series. The major alloying element is Magnesium an when it is used as a major alloying element or with manganese, the result is a moderate-to-high-strength work-hardenable alloy. Magnesium is considerably more effective than manganese as a hardener, about 0.8% Mg being equal to 1.25% Mn, and it can be added in considerably higher quantities. Alloys in this series possess good welding characteristics and relatively good resistance to corrosion in marine atmospheres. However, limitations should be placed on the amount of cold work and the operating temperatures (150 degrees F) permissible for the higher-magnesium alloys to avoid susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking.

6xxx Series. Alloys in the 6xxx series contain silicon and magnesium approximately in the proportions required for formation of magnesium silicide (Mg2Si), thus making them heat treatable. Although not as strong as most 2xxx and 7xxx alloys, 6xxx series alloys have good formability, weldability, machinability, and relatively good corrosion resistance, with medium strength. Alloys in this heat-treatable group may be formed in the T4 temper (solution heat treated but not precipitation heat treated) and strengthened after forming to full T6 properties by precipitation heat treatment.

7xxx Series. Zinc, in amounts of 1 to 8% is the major alloying element in 7xxx series alloys, and when coupled with a smaller percentage of magnesium results in heat-treatable alloys of moderate to very high strength. Usually other elements, such as copper and chromium, are also added in small quantities. 7xxx series alloys are used in airframe structures, mobile equipment, and other highly stressed parts. Higher strength 7xxx alloys exhibit reduced resistance to stress corrosion cracking and are often utilized in a slightly overaged temper to provide better combinations of strength, corrosion resistance, and fracture toughness.

Here are some pictures of “aircraft grade billet”
Attached Thumbnails
Member Input Forward Controls-sprotorbroken-001.jpg   Member Input Forward Controls-sprotorbroken-003.jpg   Member Input Forward Controls-sprotorbroken-005.jpg   Member Input Forward Controls-sprotorbroken-008.jpg  
  #21 (permalink)  
Old 01-18-2010, 07:49 AM
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Schassen,

Very informative post. I owned an aircraft business and my education is is in engineering so I understand your point. The term "aircraft grade aluminum" is used I believe to infer quality materials are being used. I do not believe the term is used to imply the metal in question can't fail.

As for your pictures showing structural failures I can only comment that ANY metal no matter how high a quality in strength it is WILL fail if it's design and structural limitations are exceeded. In other words did the failures you show happen due to shear, tension, or compression loads that exceeded structural design loads of that particular metal.
  #22 (permalink)  
Old 01-18-2010, 09:59 AM
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Oh, that broke via shear for sure, and I see where your coming from. But why couldn’t you have said they were made from 6061-T6 (more than likely) and be done. NO one would machine those out of a welded part. More than likely they started on a lathe and a waterjet or laser, then over to the CNC’s to finish them off. I am a mechanical designer who has done work in the aircraft industry as well. Why call it something other than what it is....besides most structural pieces made into the aircraft industry that I am aware of is a 7075 ish product. To me if you used a 7XXX then one could say they are "aircraft grade". But that gentleman said the "they look like they would snap off', isn’t that a form of shear? Anyways, again the product looks good and the price is fair....and believe me you are not the only one who uses that term with selling a piece of aluminum to the chopper world, and won’t be the last. But again, nice looking stuff!
  #23 (permalink)  
Old 01-18-2010, 12:26 PM
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>>Would like to hear input<<

Here's mine. (Caveat with whatever you like is cool with me )

I don't dwell on the fact I might get T-boned someday, but I do give it a bit of thought during a build. To me those types of controls might seriously escalate the mechanism of injury in any type of front end collisions. Even a mild one you might have walked away from.

On another front I wouldn't run these either. Could you imagine coming to an abrupt stop sitting behind these? Can you say evisceration?



  #24 (permalink)  
Old 01-18-2010, 03:34 PM
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ok. they are made in the USA. but who is making these for you?
they look like a knock off from hammer custom cycle.
  #25 (permalink)  
Old 01-18-2010, 08:04 PM
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Whiplash,

Hammer knockoff ? First I'm very familiar with Hammer products. Hammer has a very good product. However, Hammer wasn't the first to have the spike grips and foot pegs. Far from it. As a matter of fact look in the V-Twin catalog at their twin coil/ ignition switch mount. Then look at the Hammer twin coil/ ignition switch mount. In appearance, they don't resemble each other close. They look identical. The V-Twin mount was around before Hammer Products appeared. I'm not saying Hammer copied his from V-Twin. However, the Hammer twin/coil mount is machined much better than the V-Twin twin coil/ignition switch mount.

My point is you can only do so many variations if you want a tribal look. You can only do so many variations if you want that retro look, etc..

Schassen, you are correct I could have said 6061-T-6. But it would have required more typing. I hate to type.

Last edited by ChopperWerks; 01-18-2010 at 08:08 PM..
  #26 (permalink)  
Old 01-18-2010, 10:24 PM
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Looks great and the price is right as well. Thanks for taking the time to post pictures and showing us your work.

schassen - nice write up on the alloys, very useful - had a question for you. i'm having some custom wheels CNC-cut for me to my design. i saw the manufacturer that is doing those wheels for me gets some big shipments from South Korea in the paperwork at the port of Oakland, CA. Those shipments are billets made from forged castings of some alloy. Would wheels made from 6061-T6 or 7075-6 be stronger than ones that are made from this forged cast alloys?
  #27 (permalink)  
Old 01-19-2010, 06:03 AM
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I've always been bugged by the use of the term "billet". The first time I heard that term was in the mid 60's when a friend of mine (a cabinet maker) asked me to help him pick up a billet of wood.

As for the "aircraft grade" thing. The place I buy aluminum from lists different types of the stuff and one area specifically states "aircraft grade" - then goes into the various numbers of the stuff.

Point is - guys building bikes are not all metal pros but they have heard the terms billet and aircraft grade and they put that in a class of a better product. Putting down 6061 would only confuse them.

No matter what, it's still a good looking product at a great price.
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  #28 (permalink)  
Old 01-19-2010, 08:55 AM
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7strech4drop - wheels have been made from castings for years....an example would be the Fat Boy wheels. As far as which is stronger, this is kind of splitting hairs. The casting can be sufficient for the strength needs if the casting in manufactured correctly….with modern methods it’s hard to screw this up. Billet chunks would be what we saw on that Jesse James show on Discovery a few years back where they show of the CNC machine. Both will work for the application, one is cheaper to manufacture and one is more likely to last longer than the other.

Rastoy – I agree with the common know verbage, but my thought is if these labeled parts are more expensive because they are quote on quote “aircraft grade”. Because if there is more of a mark up on them then that is wrong, I understand that some grades are more expensive than other. I am just saying and additional mark up is untruthful. The aircraft industry uses every kind of aluminum there in a aircraft, depends on the use and material characteristics needed for a certain application. So in theory one could say that aluminum in general is “aircraft grade”. To me it just seems like the term kind of attaches some kind of prestige to it, when in fact it’s a chunk of metal.

Not trying to be a smartass or anything, it really is just an irritation for me. And to be honest you really would want very little 7XXX on a chopper because of how brittle it is (maybe the triple tree’s), everything on a chopper should be in the 6XXX series…and the most common is 6061 with a T6 temper.
  #29 (permalink)  
Old 01-19-2010, 09:25 AM
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since you brought up vtwin, i agree with you that vtwin/tedds cycle has been around longer that hammer custom cycle. but hammer has been around longer that chopperwerks.
in another post pushrod243 mentioned that your product display is just like another he posted. i happened to notice this also but disagreed with him and stated it looked more like the display of hammer's products.
the new forward controls you design and manufacture are sure becoming popular here---2 threads running at the same time!!
  #30 (permalink)  
Old 01-19-2010, 10:40 AM
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schassen - You might consider doing a write up for the Tech area about aluminum. It would be helpful for guys like me that don't do fancy things with it. I just do brackets, plates, sissy bars, etc. And before I buy I read: http://www.onlinemetals.com/aluminumguide.cfm to help me with what I need. (they are also who I buy from).
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