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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 04-15-2009, 03:24 PM
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Problem with my denvers springer

I bought a 10 over denver springer about 3 years ago. I have slowly been putting this bike together. Today I got it off the lift and with the weight of the engine and me, It looks like I screwed up measuring when I bought the front end. THe front end is lower than the rear. The frame in front measures 2 inches off the ground and the rear is 3. I love this front end. It is powdercoated black on the rear legs and chrome front. I hate the thought of doing something else. Could I modify the arms down at the axle. Move them down an inch or something. Any ideas are appreciated.
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Old 04-15-2009, 03:39 PM
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An old school fix is to cut a round 1" thick spacer (with a hole to fit your stem) and place it on the stem so when the front end is installed the spacer is beneath the lower bearings. Then install the front end. If you have enough threads on the top of the stem, this will correct the problem.
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Old 04-15-2009, 03:47 PM
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check your rockers.....sounds like you have them inverted.
could be that simple.

good luck
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Old 04-15-2009, 03:52 PM
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Post a pic, that would help.
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Old 04-15-2009, 06:32 PM
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Thanks guys. The rockers were inverted. What a relief. I had bought the frontend used and I thought I had measured right. The guy before me had them the other way. I switched them and it leveled out.
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Old 04-15-2009, 06:34 PM
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i was just about to suggest that, but someone beat me to it. I actually just flipped my rockers to the way you had yours so that a springer that is normally too long fits and drops the bike by about few inches.

you must have been happy as hell that the problem was so simple to fix :-)
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Old 04-15-2009, 07:26 PM
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Absolutely. I paid 700 for the front end and by the time I powdercoated another "non-chinese" one I would have been in for a lot more. By the way, does anyone know what happened to Parks springers. They were sweet and I almost got one instead of the denvers back in 05.
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Old 04-15-2009, 11:28 PM
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Keep in mind, If you're running the rockers upside down - your trail will be affected

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Old 04-19-2009, 09:23 AM
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No fair tossing up a picture of SB over a Denver's question. There is a lot of different geometry involved!

Most likely on a long springer, there is going to be a lot of neck rake involved and some excessive trail. The change from flipping rockers is nearly negligible.

Old school chopping generally involves adding rake and fork length, which usually results in increased trail. Turning off straight at speed becomes more heavy, but everyone seems to adapt to the change. The bigger reality is flop where the geometry makes the sides of the tire the low point of gravity so the bike likes to settle to a sidewall. The geometry in the picture above (if you can wrap your head around it) changes the geometry of rotation greatly reducing the flop effect.

There is some complex angles involved in a motorcycle front end and even more so as the front is rotated on the steering head and frame angle changes in relationship to the front. Great part is that much can be changed and a rider quickly learn to deal with the changes. Doesn't make it a "planned" design for handling, but it still works. It helps to learn about basic rake/trail relationship since some people try to mix parts incorrectly and can cause a dangerous sub-trail situation. Not likely to happen on a springer however.
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Old 04-19-2009, 10:22 AM
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the reason that I posted the pic of Sugar bear was to illustrate (via his exaggerated rockers) that reversing the rockers would have an effect on trail
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Old 04-20-2009, 04:11 PM
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Interesting thing about Sugar Bear springers...per his own posts...is that they have 0" of trail. As pointed out, if you can realize the relationship of the fork legs lower pivot center in relationship to the axle and how that affects the pivot axis of the tire, there is some different geometry going on with some obvious benefitial results. Rake/trail relationship is "easy" stuff that confuses many people. The relationship of rake and axle axis can get really confusing. Best description I can offer to the concept is turning a unicycle to change direction (center of weight directly over the tire patch) and begin leaning that unicycle back (like rake on a motorcycle) and notice how the geometry makes the tire want to settle up on the side wall of the tire (classic flop). Dropping the fork pivots on a springer basically cause a inverse of the unicycle effect and starts putting the weight load back on a more vertical line.

Like I said, complex...but shows there is a method to what some people think is just some sort of custom feature.
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Old 06-25-2016, 08:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MechWerks View Post
Interesting thing about Sugar Bear springers...per his own posts...is that they have 0" of trail. As pointed out, if you can realize the relationship of the fork legs lower pivot center in relationship to the axle and how that affects the pivot axis of the tire, there is some different geometry going on with some obvious benefitial results. Rake/trail relationship is "easy" stuff that confuses many people. The relationship of rake and axle axis can get really confusing. Best description I can offer to the concept is turning a unicycle to change direction (center of weight directly over the tire patch) and begin leaning that unicycle back (like rake on a motorcycle) and notice how the geometry makes the tire want to settle up on the side wall of the tire (classic flop). Dropping the fork pivots on a springer basically cause a inverse of the unicycle effect and starts putting the weight load back on a more vertical line.

Like I said, complex...but shows there is a method to what some people think is just some sort of custom feature.
so if someone had consumed one too many turkeys and ordered a springer a few inches to long , would using rockers similar to those sugar bear ones be the answer to that problem?
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